log

November 30, 2010

From an interview with Assange

WikiLeaks means it’s easier to run a good business and harder to run a bad business, and all CEOs should be encouraged by this. I think about the case in China where milk powder companies started cutting the protein in milk powder with plastics. That happened at a number of separate manufacturers.

Let’s say you want to run a good company. It’s nice to have an ethical workplace. Your employees are much less likely to screw you over if they’re not screwing other people over.

Then one company starts cutting their milk powder with melamine, and becomes more profitable. You can follow suit, or slowly go bankrupt and the one that’s cutting its milk powder will take you over. That’s the worst of all possible outcomes.

The other possibility is that the first one to cut its milk powder is exposed. Then you don’t have to cut your milk powder. There’s a threat of regulation that produces self-regulation.

It just means that it’s easier for honest CEOs to run an honest business, if the dishonest businesses are more effected negatively by leaks than honest businesses. That’s the whole idea. In the struggle between open and honest companies and dishonest and closed companies, we’re creating a tremendous reputational tax on the unethical companies.

Source: An interview with Wikileaks’ Julian Assange (Forbes.com)

posted by Andrew

November 29, 2010

Shutting down Wikileaks pretty simple, apparently

My all-time favourite US Senator Joseph Lieberman (he who doth protest video gaming) makes an amusing call to shut Wikileaks down. Oh man, for the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee you sure don’t have a clue about the “enemy” you’re engaging here.

posted by Andrew